Author Archives Crystal Lake Publishing

Out now – WHERE NIGHTMARES COME FROM

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisShare on Reddit

WHERE NIGHTMARES COME FROM

THE ART OF STORYTELLING IN THE HORROR GENRE

Where Nightmares Come From full cover

Book one in Crystal Lake Publishing’s The Dream Weaver series, Where Nightmares Come From focuses on the art of storytelling in the Horror genre, taking an idea from conception to reality—whether you prefer short stories, novels, films, or comics.

Featuring in-depth articles and interviews by Joe R. Lansdale (Hap & Leonard series), Clive Barker (Books of Blood), John Connolly (Charlie Parker series), Ramsey Campbell, Stephen King (IT), Christopher Golden (Ararat), Charlaine Harris (Midnight, Texas), Jonathan Maberry (Joe Ledger series), Kevin J. Anderson (Tales of Dune), Craig Engler (Z Nation), and many more.

The full non-fiction anthology lineup includes:

  • Introduction by William F. Nolan
  • IT’S THE STORY TELLER by Joe R. Lansdale
  • A-Z OF HORROR of Clive Barker
  • WHY HORROR? by Mark Alan Miller
  • PIXELATED SHADOWS by Michael Paul Gonzalez
  • LIKE CURSES by Ray Garton
  • HOW TO GET YOUR SCARE ON by S.G. Browne
  • STORYTELLING TECHNIQUES by Richard Thomas
  • HORROR IS A STATE OF MIND by Tim Waggoner
  • BRINGING AN IDEA TO LIFE by Mercedes M. Yardley
  • THE PROCESS OF A TALE by Ramsey Campbell
  • GREAT HORROR IS SOMETHING ALIEN by Michael Bailey
  • A HORRIFICALLY HAPPY MEDIUM by Taylor Grant
  • INTERVIEW WITH JOHN CONNOLLY by Marie O’Regan
  • THE STORY OF A STORY by Mort Castle
  • WRITING ROUNDTABLE INTERVIEW with Christopher Golden, Kevin J. Anderson, and Silvia Moreno-Garcia
  • HOW I SPENT MY CHILDHOOD LOOKING FOR MONSTERS AND FOUND POETRY INSTEAD by Stephanie M. Wytovich
  • BITS AND PIECES INTERVIEW WITH JONATHAN MABERRY by Eugene Johnson
  • THE REEL CREEPS by Lisa Morton
  • THE MONSTER SQUAD by Jess Landry
  • WHAT SCARES YOU by Marv Wolfman
  • PLAYING IN SOMEONE ELSE’S HAUNTED HOUSE by Elizabeth Massie
  • CREATING MAGIC FROM A BLANK PIECE OF PAPER: Del Howison interviews Tom Holland, Amber Benson, Fred Dekker, and Kevin Tenney
  • Z NATION: HOW SYFY’S HIT SHOW CAME TO LIFE by Craig Engler
  • LIFE IMITATING ART IMITATING LIFE: FILM AND ITS INFLUENCE ON REALITY by Jason V Brock
  • WHERE NIGHTMARES COME FROM by Paul Moore
  • STEPHEN KING AND RICHARD CHIZMAR DISCUSS COLLABORATING by Bev Vincent
  • CHARLAINE HARRIS DISCUSSES STORYTELLING by Eugene Johnson
  • WHAT NOW? by John Palisano

This collection is perfect for…

  • writers of all genres
  • authors looking for motivation and/or inspiration
  • authors seeking guidance
  • struggling authors searching for career advice
  • authors interested in improving their craft
  • writers interested in comics
  • authors looking into screenwriting and films
  • horror fans in general
  • those looking to better understand the different story formats
  • authors planning on infiltrating a different field in horror writing
  • artists trying to establish a name brand
  • authors looking to get published

Come listen to the legends…

Cover design by Luke Spooner. Edited by Joe Mynhardt & Eugene Johnson.

Brought to you by Crystal Lake Publishing—Tales from the Darkest Depths.

Don’t miss out…
Amazon
Goodreads

  Crystal Lake Publishing   Nov 17, 2017   Blog   0 Comment Read More

Out now – TALES FROM THE LAKE VOL.4

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisShare on Reddit

The legend continues with the TALES FROM THE LAKE VOL.4: THE HORROR ANTHOLOGY

Tales from The Lake Vol.4 book cover

Twenty-four heart-rending tales with elements of terror, mystery, and a nightmarish darkness that knows no end.

Welcome to my lake. Welcome to where dreams and hope are illusions…and pain is God.

In the spirit of popular Dark Fiction and Horror anthologies such as Gutted: Beautiful Horror Stories and Behold: Oddities, Curiosities and Undefinable Wonders, and the best of Stephen King’s short fiction, comes Crystal Lake Publishing’s Tales from The Lake anthologies.

This fourth volume of Speculative Fiction contains the following short stories:

  • Jennifer Loring – When the Dead Come Home
  • Joe R. Lansdale – The Folding Man
  • Kealan Patrick Burke – Go Warily After Dark
  • T. E. Grau – To the Hills
  • Damien Angelica Walters – Everything Hurts, Until it Doesn’t
  • Sheldon Higdon – Drowning in Sorrow
  • Max Booth III – Whenever You Exhale, I Inhale
  • Bruce Golden – The Withering
  • JG Faherty – Grave Secrets
  • Hunter Liguore – End of the Hall
  • David Dunwoody – Snowmen
  • Timothy G. Arsenault – Pieces of Me
  • Maria Alexander – Neighborhood Watchers
  • Timothy Johnson – The Story of Jessie and Me
  • Michael Bailey – I will be the Reflection Until the End
  • E.E. King – The Honeymoon’s Over
  • Darren Speegle – Song in a Sundress
  • Cynthia Ward – Weighing In
  • Michael Haynes – Reliving the Past
  • Leigh M. Lane – The Long Haul
  • Mark Cassell – Dust Devils
  • Del Howison – Liminality
  • Gene O’Neill – The Gardener
  • Jeff Cercone – Condo by the Lake

With an introduction by editor Ben Eads. Cover art by Ben Baldwin.

Experience great fiction today in paperback or Kindle on Amazon.

Remember to add it on Goodreads (and leave a review if you like it).

Series: Tales from the Lake
Tales from the Lake: Volume 1

Tales from the Lake: Volume 1

$3,99
Dive into fourteen tales of horror, with short stories and dark poems by some of the best horror writers in the world. More info →
Buy from Barnes and Noble
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Tales from the Lake: Volume 2
Tales from the Lake: Volume 3
Tales from the Lake: Volume 4

  Crystal Lake Publishing   Oct 27, 2017   Blog   0 Comment Read More

Out now – QUIET PLACES by Jasper Bark

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisShare on Reddit

 

Out today – a brand new Jasper Bark novella…

In the quiet of the forest, the darkest fears are born.

Quiet Places book full cover

The people of Dunballan, harbour a dark secret. A secret more terrible than the Beast that stalks the dense forests of Dunballan. A secret that holds David McCavendish, last in a long line of Lairds, in its unbreakable grip.

It’s down to Sally, David’s lover, to free David from the sinister clutches of the Beast. But, with the whole town against her, she must ally herself with an ancient woodland force and trace Dunballan’s secret back to its bitter origins. Those origins lie within the McCavendish family history, and a blasphemous heresy that stretches back to the beginning of time. Some truths are too terrible to face, and the darkest of these lie waiting for Sally, in the Quiet Places.

Quiet Places is folk horror at its most cosmic and terrifying. Blending folklore with psychological terror, it contains stories within stories, each one leading to revelations more unsettling than the last. Revelations that will change the way you view your place in the cosmos, and haunt you, relentlessly, long after you have put down this book.

Quiet Places is a novella in the Heresy Series story cycle and has been substantially rewritten and revised for this edition.

Grab it from Amazon

Goodreads

Author: Jasper Bark
Quiet Places by Jasper Bark

Quiet Places by Jasper Bark

eBook: $3,99
Author:
In the quiet of the forest, the darkest fears are born. More info →
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Writers on Writing Volume 1-4 Omnibus: An Author’s Guide
Run to Ground

Run to Ground

$3,99
Author:
Genre: Novella
Jim Mcleod is on the run. More info →
Buy from Barnes and Noble
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Amazon Kindle
The Final Cut

The Final Cut

$4,99
Author:
Some stories capture the imagination, others will be the death of you. More info →
Buy from Barnes and Noble
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Writers on Writing: Volume 1
Stuck on You and Other Prime Cuts

Stuck on You and Other Prime Cuts

$2,99
Author:
Genre: Novella
A word of caution gentle reader, these tales will take you places you’ve never been before and may never dare revisit. More info →
Buy from Barnes and Noble
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Stuck on You

Stuck on You

$2,99
Author:
Genre: Novella
Cheating husband Ricardo could never keep it in his pants, and now it’s stuck in the worst possible place . His Mexican road trip becomes a nightmare straight out of urban legend when he agrees to take the wrong woman back over the border. A bolt of lightning sees him fused to his fellow cheater on a detour into the backwoods. Now he’s fighting wild beasts and raw nature just to stay alive in this dark comedy romance that blends erotic horror with black humour and extreme splatter. More info →
For the Night is Dark

For the Night is Dark

$0,99
Darkness, our most primitive fear since shadows first moved.

The Dark is coming!

Call your friends. No one should wander through the dark alone. More info →

Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon

  Crystal Lake Publishing   Sep 29, 2017   Blog   0 Comment Read More

TALES FROM THE LAKE VOL.4 cover reveal!

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisShare on Reddit

Coming this Halloween:

Tales from The Lake Vol.4 book cover

Joe R. Lansdale, The Folding Man.

Jennifer Loring, When the Dead Come Home.

Kealan Patrick Burke, Go Warily After Dark.

E. Grau, To the Hills.

Damien Angelica Walters, Everything Hurts, Until it Doesn’t.

Sheldon Higdon, Drowning in Sorrow.

Max Booth III, Whenever You Exhale, I Inhale.

Bruce Golden, The Withering.

JG Faherty, Grave Secrets.

Hunter Liguore, End of the Hall.

David Dunwoody, Snowmen.

Timothy G. Arsenault, Pieces of Me.

Maria Alexander, Neighborhood Watchers.

Timothy Johnson, The Story of Jessie and Me.

Michael Bailey, I will be the Reflection Until the End.

E.E. King, The Honeymoon’s Over.

Darren Speegle, Song in a Sundress.

Cynthia Ward, Weighing In.

Michael Haynes, Reliving the Past.

Leigh M. Lane, The Long Haul.

Mark Cassell, Dust Devils.

Del Howison, Liminality.

Gene O’ Neill, The Gardener.

Jeff Cercone, Condo by the Lake.

Series: Tales from the Lake
Tales from the Lake: Volume 1

Tales from the Lake: Volume 1

$3,99
Dive into fourteen tales of horror, with short stories and dark poems by some of the best horror writers in the world. More info →
Buy from Barnes and Noble
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Tales from the Lake: Volume 2
Tales from the Lake: Volume 3
Tales from the Lake: Volume 4

 

 

  Crystal Lake Publishing   Sep 25, 2017   Blog   0 Comment Read More

Out today! UGLY LITTLE THINGS by Todd Keisling

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisShare on Reddit

 

THIS IS GOING TO HURT

The eleven stories in Ugly Little Things explore the depths of human suffering and ugliness, charting a course to the dark, horrific heart of the human condition. The terrors of everyday existence are laid bare in this eerie collection of short fiction from the twisted mind of Todd Keisling, author of the critically-acclaimed novels A Life Transparent and The Liminal Man.

Ugly Little Things wraparound cover art by Ben Baldwin

With an introduction by Bram Stoker Award-winner Mercedes M. Yardley and illustrations by Luke Spooner, Ugly Little Things will be your atlas, guiding you along a lonely road of sorrow, loss, and regret. This is going to hurt—and you’re going to like it.

“Todd Keisling is a born storyteller, drawing the reader into artfully constructed narratives that scout the darker end of the literary spectrum with skill and bravado.  A pleasure to read, his stories linger well after the last page has been turned.  Excellent stuff.” – John Langan, author of The Fisherman

Experience it today!
Amazon
Goodreads
Trailer

  Crystal Lake Publishing   Sep 15, 2017   Blog   0 Comment Read More

John Connolly joins WHERE NIGHTMARES COME FROM line-up

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisShare on Reddit

Huge announcement!

We’re really stepping up our game here at Crystal Lake Publishing. I’m happy to share the current WHERE NIGHTMARES COME FROM line-up, and update it with a brand new interview with John Connolly, author of the Charlie Parker books, as well as NOCTURNES, my favorite short story collection. Thanks to author Marie O’Regan for making this happen.

Author John Connolly

The rest of the line-up includes: Joe R. Lansdale, Bev Vincent, Richard Chizmar, Stephen King, Charlaine Harris, Jonathan Maberry, Lisa Morton, Ray Garton, Elizabeth Massie, Del Howison, Amber Benson, Tom Holland, Fred Dekker, Kevin Tenney, Tim Waggoner, Michael Bailey, Mercedes Yardley, Jason V. Brock, and many more…

There are a lot more names to announce (huge surprises), and we’ll reveal one new name every week. The book is edited by myself and Eugene Johnson. It’ll be out some time in October or November.

Follow the FaceBook page so you don’t miss out.

  Crystal Lake Publishing   Aug 30, 2017   Blog   0 Comment Read More

The Deep End author interview with Richard Thomas

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisShare on Reddit

The Deep End author interview with Richard Thomas

 

Joe Mynhardt: Tell us a bit (or a lot) more about your childhood. Primary school, high school, etc. How do you think your experiences benefited or influenced your career?

Richard Thomas: I was always a big reader. Won a spelling bee in fifth grade, and a reading challenge in sixth grade for most books read. In high school English was always my best subject, and even classes like spelling and mythology really resonated with me. I was reading Stephen King by then, starting with The Shining, which scared the crap out of me.

Author Richard Thomas

Joe: Can you recall a moment where you had to choose between being an author/artist and another career? A decisive moment where you decided to go all out?

RT: For sure. I got into writing after seeing Fight Club, the movie. I went and read every book by Chuck Palahniuk and that woke me up, inspired me. I went to his website, The Cult, and hung out, taking classes with Max Barry (which got me my first novel, Transubstantiate), Monica Drake, Jack Ketchum (which got me Disintegration, my second novel, based on his idea to “write your worst fear”), and Craig Clevenger. That got me to The Velvet, another website, where I read CC, Will Christopher Baer (informing my neo-noir voice) and Stephen Graham Jones (who has been a huge influence and inspiration). Based on that success, and a story of mine, “Stillness”, getting into Shivers VI (Cemetery Dance) alongside Stephen King and Peter Straub, I decided to get my MFA. That was the first serious investment of time and money, but it wasn’t until last year that I decided to leave advertising where I’ve been a graphic designer and art director for 25 years, to write, edit, publish, and teach. I now do that full time.

Joe: How did you respond to your very first success as an author? Was it just rewarding, or did it motivate you even more? Or, did it perhaps feel underwhelmed, which motivated you to even greater heights?

RT: Getting that story, “Stillness”, into Shivers VI alongside King, I broke down and cried. My first true success as an author. I felt like maybe I didn’t totally suck, and that was the first time I got the thrill of the chase and win, and thought maybe this could become my career.

Joe: How has your career as an author affected relationships with friends and family?

RT: My family is very supportive, and it’s very exciting when I have big news. When I was able to take the advance money from my books Disintegration and Breaker and buy us a new AC for the house, my wife saw it was real money, and not just a hobby. My kids are big readers and really like what I’m doing (yes, they can read some of my work). My wife can’t handle the dark stories, haha. When I went to Transylvania to teach, when I went to UC-Riverside in California as a guest author, when I started teaching at the University of Iowa in the summer—they saw it was real, and how it might be something we could all share in, together. When we drove cross country to LA for The New Black release party that was a blast.

Joe: Which author most influenced your early career? And who still does?

RT: Early was King for sure, but I don’t write like him at all. I recently sold a story, “Nodus Tollens,” that was probably the first (out of 135 published to date) that actually sounded like him. For neo-noir, it’s definitely Baer. Stephen Graham Jones is a huge influence; he really raises the bar. For instance, his novel Mongrels (I saw an early draft and tried to buy it for Dark House Press but was too slow, but William Morrow did great with it) inspired my “we” story, “Asking for Forgiveness” (long-listed for Best Horror of the Year). His story, “Faberge”, which will be up at Gamut this month (July) inspired my story, “Undone,” which is a 1,500-word story in one sentence. I know, nuts. Anybody I’ve published in my anthologies or at Dark House Press or Gamut have influenced my work. In my MFA it was Denis Johnson, Mary Gaitskill, Cormac McCarthy, Joyce Carol Oates, Haruki Murakami and many others. I’m also a big fan of Benjamin Percy, Paul Tremblay, Damien Angelica Walters, Angela Slatter, Usman T. Malik, Brian Evenson, and so many other great voice. The list is huge.

Joe: Instead of just focussing on your most successful work, which story are you the proudest of, a story that managed to capture a piece of who you are?

RT: Wow, that’s tough. Disintegration is definitely my most personal novel. For short stories, maybe “Victimized” since it’s one of the few that’s a female POV, and the women I beta-tested it with said I did a good job with that aspect of it. It’s almost 7,000-words, so probably my longest short story. I really like the two that came out last year, “The Offering on the Hill” (Chiral Mad 3) and “Repent” (Gutted: Beautiful Horror Stories). I was able to somehow write and sell five stories so far in 2017, one, “Battle Not with Monsters”, landing at Cemetery Dance (again). Of course “Chasing Ghosts”, my first story in CD was a big deal. And the one I sold this year to Crystal Lake for Behold is very risky, thrilled that Doug liked it, “Hiraeth”. The work I’m doing this year is pretty out there. Hopefully people like it.

Joe: How do you feel when you don’t make your target words for the day?

RT: I don’t write every day. It’s either on or off, working or not. I write in spurts. But luckily I type fast (70 wpm) so I can write a 3,000-word story in a day. My best day was 12,000 words at the end of writing Breaker (currently up for a Thriller Award), in one day. I wrote 25,000 words in 25 days. My biggest week was 40,000 in five days, the second half of Disintegration. If the writing fails that day, I don’t dwell on it. It happens all the time. I step away, do something else, and come back to it.

Joe: What’s the most difficult topic for you to write?

RT: I try to avoid writing rape scenes, but there’s an intense on The Soul Standard, in my novella, Golden Geese. I also avoid molestation, incest, beastiality, etc. I’ve only really written one story with molestation, “Rudy Jenkins Buries His Fears”, and that was a really hard sell, took forever, even though he exacts justice and revenge. Landed in an anthology with Jack Ketchum. And the only real incest is a storyline in Breaker, but it’s not really true, not what it seems. Out of everything I’ve written, that’s it.

Joe: What do you do to distract you enough to actually relax a bit? Or do you always think about writing?

RT: I love good food, movies, reading, getting outside and doing something physical (hiking, tennis, golf, basketball, biking, games, etc.).

Joe: Outside of the actual craft, what is the most useful skill you learnt from being an author?

RT: That not everyone wants you to succeed. There are so many haters. And people constantly surprise me—good and bad. When we launched the Kickstarter for Gamut, which ended up raising $55,000, there were so many people who not only didn’t back it, but did very little to spread the word and support ANY of my efforts. That crushed me. And then they’d send me notes asking when the doors were opening, since they wanted that 10-cents a word paycheck. That hurt. A lot. But then there were people that stepped up and donated books (such as yourself, Joe!) and other items, friends who chipped in several thousand dollars, no strings attached, as we got close, making sure we made it. A total stranger donated $3,000 and when I asked her why, she just said it was important what we were doing, and to just make it happen. She’s now a student of mine, very talented, her work will be breaking out soon, I’m sure. Those people offset the others. Inspired me to keep going.

Joe: How did being author change you as a person?

RT: It taught me to go after my dreams and to never give up. I don’t think I realised how much my writing career meant to me until I started having success, and realised how fulfilling it was, how important it was to me. I live a different life now, and I fight for every moment.

Joe: Which response/comment from a reader has touched you the most throughout your career?

RT: There’s a note at the end of Breaker that talks about abuse (the main character Ray deals with abuse in his childhood and in fact the title comes from his working in underground fight clubs and trying to break the cycle of abuse). She said thank you so much for putting that at the end of the book, that she cried, but it meant so much what I had to say about survival, and how the light at the end of the tunnel isn’t always a train bearing down, but something a way out of the darkness. That meant a lot. A few people have reached out to say thanks for what I’m doing at Gamut, when it comes to diversity. I’ve had a few gay authors, and gender-fluid authors drop me notes, as well as authors from different countries around the globe, even just authors saying thanks for supporting women. Which means a lot. But to me, I guess I don’t feel like I’m doing anything special, it seems like the bare minimum, to not judge or rejected based on anything but the quality of the writing and how it fits in at Gamut. It’s part of why we read blind, but I also make an effort to let authors know that everyone is welcome.

Joe: What is your life-long goal as an author?

RT: To keep writing stories and novels, to be able to keep this dream alive, making a living as an author. It’s not easy. To make Gamut a huge success, to keep it going. Subscriptions have not been great, maybe 200 new since we launched. But if we can only get to double our base of 650, I think we can sustain just based on that. When you add in our editing services, our film series, our retreat, our first Best of Gamut anthology, and everything else—we have a shot. But it’s not going to be easy. I’d love to see some of my work adapted into films. When I write I can see it all unfurling, the film rolling. That would be amazing.

Joe: What legacy do you want to leave behind?

RT: Man, that’s a great question. I do think about it. I want my stories and novels to be worth reading in 10, 20, 100 years. I want them to be timeless. I know they won’t all survive, but I hope some will. I want to be part of the landscape, to be a name people recognise, and remember. And beyond that, I want to help other authors grow, find inspiration, evolve as writers, and make their mark. I’d like to help their dreams come true, as well.

  Crystal Lake Publishing   Aug 25, 2017   Blog   0 Comment Read More

Cover Reveal for Jasper Bark’s QUIET PLACES – A Novella of Cosmic Folk Horror

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisShare on Reddit

Coming September 29th! Cover art by Ben Baldwin:

Cover art for Jasper Bark's QUIET PLACES - A Novella of Cosmic Folk Horror

In the quiet of the forest, the darkest fears are born.

The people of Dunballan, harbour a dark secret. A secret more terrible than the Beast that stalks the dense forests of Dunballan. A secret that holds David McCavendish, last in a long line of Lairds, in its unbreakable grip.

It’s down to Sally, David’s lover, to free David from the sinister clutches of the Beast. But, with the whole town against her, she must ally herself with an ancient woodland force and trace Dunballan’s secret back to its bitter origins. Those origins lie within the McCavendish family history, and a blasphemous heresy that stretches back to the beginning of time. Some truths are too terrible to face, and the darkest of these lie waiting for Sally, in the Quiet Places.

Quiet Places is folk horror at its most cosmic and terrifying. Blending folklore with psychological terror, it contains stories within stories, each one leading to revelations more unsettling than the last. Revelations that will change the way you view your place in the cosmos, and haunt you, relentlessly, long after you have put down this book.

Quiet Places is a novella in the Heresy Series story cycle and has been substantially rewritten and revised for this edition.

Author: Jasper Bark
Quiet Places by Jasper Bark

Quiet Places by Jasper Bark

eBook: $3,99
Author:
In the quiet of the forest, the darkest fears are born. More info →
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Writers on Writing Volume 1-4 Omnibus: An Author’s Guide
Run to Ground

Run to Ground

$3,99
Author:
Genre: Novella
Jim Mcleod is on the run. More info →
Buy from Barnes and Noble
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Amazon Kindle
The Final Cut

The Final Cut

$4,99
Author:
Some stories capture the imagination, others will be the death of you. More info →
Buy from Barnes and Noble
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Writers on Writing: Volume 1
Stuck on You and Other Prime Cuts

Stuck on You and Other Prime Cuts

$2,99
Author:
Genre: Novella
A word of caution gentle reader, these tales will take you places you’ve never been before and may never dare revisit. More info →
Buy from Barnes and Noble
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon
Stuck on You

Stuck on You

$2,99
Author:
Genre: Novella
Cheating husband Ricardo could never keep it in his pants, and now it’s stuck in the worst possible place . His Mexican road trip becomes a nightmare straight out of urban legend when he agrees to take the wrong woman back over the border. A bolt of lightning sees him fused to his fellow cheater on a detour into the backwoods. Now he’s fighting wild beasts and raw nature just to stay alive in this dark comedy romance that blends erotic horror with black humour and extreme splatter. More info →
For the Night is Dark

For the Night is Dark

$0,99
Darkness, our most primitive fear since shadows first moved.

The Dark is coming!

Call your friends. No one should wander through the dark alone. More info →

Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Buy from Amazon

  Crystal Lake Publishing   Aug 25, 2017   Blog   0 Comment Read More

The Deep End interview with author J.S. Breukelaar

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisShare on Reddit

The Deep End interview with author J.S. Breukelaar

 

Joe: Tell us a bit (or a lot) more about your childhood. Primary school, high school, etc. How do you think your experiences benefited or influenced your career?

JS: I grew up in a small town in western New York State modelled on Little Ridge, in Aletheia. When I was a teenager, my family moved us to Sydney, Australia, which for a small-town American girl was like going to a different planet. I moved back to the States for a while and these days I straddle the two hemispheres pretty seamlessly, but I think that shock to my system—moving from a remote lake town to the big smoke on the other side of the planet—was profoundly disorientating and this sense of disorientation is in everything I write.

Author J.S. Breukelaar

Joe: Can you recall a moment where you had to choose between being an author/artist and another career? A decisive moment where you decided to go all out?

JS: No. I was always an author, if not in action then in intention. The moment when I decided to stop taking crap jobs to support those intentions was when I was a young mother and my husband and I decided to go back to school. We had two kids and I was still doing all sorts of part-time jobs like temping and data entry and so on and one of my husband’s colleagues offered me another data entry job. It was worth $300 and I said no. I decided that hell or high water, writing for money—didn’t matter what kind of writing—to support writing for love was going to be the rule from then on. The next week, a friend at Time Warner Publications sent me a book for me to write a sample review. If it was any good, I could be a regular book reviewer for Who Weekly (the Australia-New Zealand title of People Weekly). They took my review and that, along with a gig ghostwriting fashion copy for a clothing manufacturer (like Elaine in Seinfeld for the J Peterman catalogue), was how I paid my way through school. Since then, all my day jobs have been writing or teaching.

Joe: How did you respond to your very first success as an author? Was it just rewarding, or did it motivate you even more? Or, did it perhaps feel underwhelmed, which motivated you to even greater heights?

JS: I got an article accepted by the San Diego Herald Tribune and I yelled so loud you could hear me down in Mexico. It was a total high. I sold my first fiction story to John Joseph Adams at Lightspeed. Cue more screaming and yelling.

Joe: How has your career as an author affected relationships with friends and family?

JS: It hasn’t. Of course I’ve made some friends who I wouldn’t have made without being a writer, and my life is better with them in it. My family continues to be the air that I breathe, and the reason I do this is to make them proud, so I love it when they are. Except that probably would have been the case no matter what career I chose. Intense writing jags, when I don’t come out of my office for days at a time, are tough on my husband, but that’s what you sign up for, right? I try and make it up to him.

Joe: Which author most influenced your early career? And who still does?

JS: Pretty sure that my early career was influenced by writers I read at college, and before that even. Cervantes first, then Poe, Melville, Shelley, Pynchon, Don DeLillo, Oates, McCarthy, Borges. I read, along with Cervantes, a lot of Latino writers and I’m sure they had a lasting influence—Cisneros, Fuentes, Bolano, Marquez—along with Straub, King, Shelley. And the list just gets longer—Stephen Graham Jones, Kelly Link, Joe Hill, Jeffrey Ford, Cathrynne Valente, Amelia Gray, Seb Doubinsky—I wouldn’t call them influences as much as wild rides thundering up the road just ahead of me, just around the next bend.

Aletheia novel, a supernatural thriller by author J.S. Breukelaar

Joe: Instead of just focusing on your most successful work, which story are you the proudest of, a story that managed to capture a piece of who you are?

JS: I’m proud of my breakout story, “Lion Man.” That took me back to a house that had been haunting me for a while and unleashed a lot of other stories I didn’t know were in me. And I’m proud of a recent story, “Rogues Bay 3030” (Gamut), which is set in a different landscape, a more antipodean place that was harder for me to reach in my fiction, and I’m glad I finally did.

Joe: How do you feel when you don’t make your target words for the day?

JS: Itchy all over.

Joe: What’s the most difficult topic for you to write?

JS: They’re all difficult.

Joe: What do you do to distract you enough to actually relax a bit? Or do you always think about writing?

JS: I always think about writing. I’m most relaxed when I’m working. I run. I spend time with my family. I’m a Netflix junkie.

Joe: Tell us a bit about the people you met while researching a book. Are you still friends with some of them?

JS: For my first book, which was about a DJ, I met a bunch of musicians and DJs. They were generous of their time and talents, but I’m not really still friends with them. For American Monster, I spent time on the road in Southern California, and people I met worked their way into the book, and I’m grateful for that kindness of strangers. The characters in that book are still very much my friends if that counts.

Joe: Outside of the actual craft, what is the most useful skill you learnt from being an author?

JS: Being organised. It’s a skill I haven’t mastered yet but it’s the one that, when I do, will give me special powers.

Joe: How did being author change you as a person?

JS: Not really at all. I wasn’t ever not an author.

Joe: Which response /comment from a reader has touched you the most throughout your career?

JS: That’s impossible to say. Every single time anyone reaches out—either in person or on Goodreads or wherever— to tell me that something I wrote touched them in some indelible way, it pretty much proves to me that this thing with words is something we should all just keep doing the best way we can. Most recently I was at WFC and a reader commented that American Monster destroyed them and made them different after that, and by the end of the conversation we were both in tears. I’ll always be grateful for moments like that. Oh, and a beta reader for Aletheia told me that after she finished the read, she went on to an iconic novel by a bestselling author, and the whole time she was reading that she couldn’t get my characters out of her head. “How do you do that?” she asked. So I guess that thing we do, finding characters that live on in hearts and minds, is pretty much the end game here.

Joe: What is your life-long goal as an author?

JS: Survival. I don’t mean that flippantly, or even in terms of the “business,” but literally. Getting this wascally wabbit under control is part of that, but it’s ongoing. Every time you think you’ve got it wrangled—words and sentences and story and character and time—it slips out from under and you’re back to that same old thing again. Process. Practice. Survival.

Joe: What legacy do you want to leave behind?

JS: I don’t think about that, honestly. Kind of like asking a bullfighter or a gladiator or a werewolf about legacies. You’re too caught up in going the distance to think about what happens after that.

  Crystal Lake Publishing   Aug 18, 2017   Blog   0 Comment Read More

“The Smoke” by Randall Mincy

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on TumblrShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisShare on Reddit

The Smoke

 

Randall Mincy

 

 

Sometimes you can see a faint pillar of smoke rising up out of the trees. On those nights where the wind doesn’t blow, but whistles, the same nights where no one has their car on the road and for some odd reason the crickets forget to cricket, and you find yourself out all alone with nothing but the Chemical Plant that sits close to State.  As if this wasn’t enough, the plant is continuously churning out this unnatural noise that just makes you question every breath of air you take. Only on nights like these is it possible to see the smoke.

The smoke itself could easily be written off as being a product of the ever present fog, or the “who knows what” escaping from the vents from the chemical plant, but to those who are unfortunate enough to catch a glimpse of this mysterious pillar, the sight is unmistakable.


Something about the smoke sets it apart. Just hearing about the smoke gives a person a sickening feeling, the same one your grandmother can get when it’s sunny and 75, not a cloud in the sky except for the one that has perfectly shielded just enough of the sun’s rays that you can stay outside for hours without getting too hot, but right as you are enjoying that perfect warmth Grandma walks back inside the screen door, only to warn you of the eminent storm approaching.


One who has caught sight of this eerie billow of smoke often has trouble getting a clear view. You see, for some reason there is a mystery as to exactly where the smoke arises from. It can barely be distinguished from standing on the train tracks, and if you go farther back toward I-64, for some odd reason, the smoke is hardly noticeable. Still, for one reason or another, a person knows it’s there. Many people can truthfully say that they have seen the strange fog, but few have been able to comprehend its existence.


Many locals who believe that there is more to the mysterious smoke than just coincidence, have erected many a tale to explain the occurrence, but one seems to stand atop the rest. A while back, when everybody still lived in the hills, there lived a group of miners who resided somewhere deep in the trees, not necessarily miles back to where no one could easily approach them, but in such a place that made it difficult to be found.  At the same time it was a place where it was easy to find lost souls meandering through the woods on the nights previously mentioned. 


As the story goes, there were three men: Artimus, Winley, and Job. And while the men were not related by blood, through some long-standing relationship, or a binding experience, they were brothers. And on those nights where the crickets forget how to cricket, and the wind doesn’t blow but whistles, the brothers would go out. It is never specified what made them decide to go on this unnatural mission, but what is known is that they were hunting. Hunting for sustenance, hunting for life. On those nights the men would wait, hoping for a curious soul to stumble upon their camp, not knowing what would be waiting in the brush.  

 

But on those nights the men’s hunger would take hold, and when an unlucky creature would cross paths with Artimus, Winley, and Job, no one ever heard a noise, neither a yelp nor a cry, not a grimace nor a moan. All that could be seen was the meek pillar of smoke, rising up from the trees, the smoke that smelled of human flesh.

©Randall Mincy – 2015

  Crystal Lake Publishing   Aug 04, 2017   Blog   0 Comment Read More
Page 1 of 812345...Last »